Pōwhiri

On this page

Summary

Kawa

Summary

The very first part of Annual Conference is the pōwhiri. It's a welcome ceremony by the tangata whenua that draws everyone together in the opening of the conference.

Manuhiri assemble outside the Events Centre main doors before the pōwhiri.

Kawa

Pōwhiri is a ceremony of welcome by the tāngata whenua (the people of the land) to the manuhiri (the visitors to that land) and is an opportunity for sacred (tapu) visitors to move from that state to one of being a commoner (state of being noa). This is also an opportunity for representatives to Annual Conference to meet and greet old and new friends. The kawa (protocol) for pōwhiri determines the roles and responsibilities of each group.The very first part of Annual Conference is the pōwhiri. It's a welcome ceremony by the tangata whenua that draws everyone together in the opening of the conference.

Manuhiri assemble outside the Events Centre main doors before the pōwhiri.

Tāngata Whenua

Tāngata whenua meet inside the Rotorua Energy Events Centre half an hour before the pōwhiri and select kaikaranga (caller/s), kaikōrero (speaker/s) and decide on waiata to be sung. Use this time to practice if necessary.

Manuhiri

Manuhiri assemble outside the venue half an hour before the pōwhiri and through the kaumatua (elders); select the kaikaranga (caller/s) and kaikōrero (speaker/s). Choose waiata according to the number of your kaikōrero. Kaikōrero remember te reo Māori.

Tāngata Whenua

The number of speakers can change when others decide to speak at the last minute but an extra waiata or two will cover this scenario. Consider waiata that are known by the majority to ensure full participation.

Manuhiri

The number of speakers can change when others decide to speak at the last minute but an extra waiata or two will cover this scenario. Consider waiata that are known by the majority to ensure full participation.

Tāngata Whenua

As their kaikaranga begins to karanga (call), tāngata whenua stand and remain standing until all manuhiri are in the room and waiting to be seated. When the tāngata whenua sit that is the signal for the manuhiri to sit.

Manuhiri

When the call is heard, manuhiri move behind their kaikaranga and follow her directions.

Move quickly to fill seats on both sides, leave first two rows for the paepae manuhiri (speakers’ list for the visitors) and wait for tāngata whenua to sit which is the signal for manuhiri to sit.

Tāngata Whenua

Tāngata whenua begin the kōrero and continue until their paepae (speakers’ list) have spoken and accompanying waiata sung.

Manuhiri

Manuhiri will then reply with their kōrero until all their paepae have spoken and the accompanying waiata have been sung.

Tāngata Whenua

When the manuhiri whaikōrero are concluded, tāngata whenua stand and invite the manuhiri to move across to greet them in the appropriate manner.

Manuhiri

Manuhiri will respond to the invitation from the tāngata whenua by moving across to greet them in the appropriate manner.

Tāngata Whenua

The hongi is a formal greeting and is an opportunity for people to mingle their breath, hence the pressing of noses. Some people are less formal and prefer to kiss. Tāngata whenua may need to give some direction.

Manuhiri

The hongi is a formal greeting and is an opportunity for people to mingle their breath, hence the pressing of noses. Some people are less formal and prefer to kiss but when in doubt, take direction from the tāngata whenua.

Tāngata Whenua

Tāngata whenua invite manuhiri to share the blessed food in the Grand Hall.

Manuhiri

Manuhiri accept the invitation to share blessed food in the venue.

Tāngata Whenua

Sharing food completes the pōwhiri. Manuhiri have moved from tapu to noa and can now interact with the tāngata whenua.

Manuhiri

Sharing food completes the pōwhiri. Manuhiri have moved from tapu to noa and can now interact with the tāngata whenua.

Was this page useful? 1 Star2 Stars Loading...